Victoria Pilates Welcomes Back Nicole & Welcomes Jessica!

As many of you know, Nicole Runcie has been away for the past two years, studying for her master’s degree in physical therapy at UBC. She is back with us as a Pilates instructor, as well as completing her interim physiotherapy hours at a local practice in Victoria. For those of you who have not yet met Nicole, she looks forward to meeting and working with you.
Jessica Vitrouk is new to our studio and we look forward to having her on our team. She is originally from Boston, Massachusetts, but has lived in many countries around the world. Originally a tax consultant with a degree in Russian studies, Jessica eventually decided to further her education in Pilates. She began her teacher training with Balanced Body in Boston, and continued her training in Brussels, Belgium. She looks forward to learning and growing with our team at Victoria Pilates!

Keeping a Healthy Lifestyle Over the Holidays

As the holidays approach, we tend to become relaxed on our health, wellness and fitness routines. With holiday gatherings, events and shopping (& those tasty treats), it can be tempting to skip your Pilates and other exercise classes.

While it’s important to enjoy the holiday festivities, it’s also important to remember to take care of yourself. Here are some great ways to take care of your mind and body during the busy holiday season:

  • Make your plans in advance. If you know when your big events are, it may be easier to plan around them and make sure you make it to your fitness commitments as well.
  • Try to get outside once a day, even if it’s just for 15 minutes, rain or shine!
  • Plan a health & wellness activity with a friend. Whether it’s a Pilates or other fitness class, a day at the spa, or a simple visit over tea, a visit with a friend is a great way to relax.
  • Plan outdoor holiday activities with your family when possible. Fresh air and light exercise (depending on yours and your family’s mobility level) is a great way to bond over the holidays. Whether it’s a trip to Butchart Gardens, or a walk through Sidney or Victoria to look at the lights, there are lots of outdoor winter activities to take part in.
  • Don’t overdo it! If you’re feeling tired or overwhelmed, remember that it’s okay to spend some time alone. Curl up with a book, have a nap, or head out for a walk alone.

 

If you’re looking for other ways to keep up with a healthy lifestyle over the holidays, join us for our De-Stress Workshop in November! Details in our Workshops & Specialty Class section!

Continuing Education With Our Instructors – The 3 Core Perspectives Workshop

Wendy_Leblanc-ArbuckleOver this past weekend, renowned Pilates elder, Wendy Leblanc Arbuckle (Pilates Center of Austin) held an intensive workshop at Victoria Pilates. Most of our instructors were in attendance, along with professionals from the USA and other areas of BC.

Victoria Pilates owner, Susan Van Cadsand, has known Wendy for a number of years, and shares an aligned vision with Wendy’s teaching style and techniques. Susan asked Wendy to instruct her “3 Core Connections Perspective” to help further educate Pilates instructors and movement professionals in how to develop their instruction styles.

Wendy helped instructors develop their cuing techniques and to further understand the deep relationships between all of the body systems, and human movement potential.

Anyone familiar with Pilates understands that core control involves the entire body. However, Wendy’s perspective elaborates further, and helps instructors to gain a better understanding of how this happens through core coordination. Through cue refining and learning about the core as a relationship with ourselves and our environment, practitioners were able to gain a more intuitive perspective of body awareness and intelligence.

Everyone who attended the workshop enjoyed it and look forward to sharing Wendy’s teachings with you!

Life is Motion!

 

While Pilates exercises seek to restore the body’s capacity for flowing motion, osteopathic treatment seeks to restore the inherent motility of each body part.  By restoring the individual parts, and integrating the parts into the whole, health and harmony are achieved.

Optimum health depends upon the free movement of the joints, bones, organs, muscles, and connective tissues.  The heart must beat fully and the lungs expand freely for vibrant health.  Other organs also must move in their natural rhythms.  The gut must pulsate enthusiastically as it pulls in nutrients.  The liver must rock as it processes toxins to render them harmless.  And the most essential organ—the brain—must expand and contract six to fourteen times a minute to enliven the whole body.  Restriction of any of these critical motions can damage health.

Because the body parts are interconnected, restriction of motion in one area can have profound effects elsewhere.  An ankle sprain doesn’t just restrict the normal range of motion of the foot.  It can have a ripple effect elsewhere, as other joints are strained, stretched and pushed out of alignment as they try to compensate for the ankle’s dysfunction.  Low back pain may originate as an ankle problem.  As the pelvis reacts to the ankle’s instability, the sacrum rotates out of alignment, twisting the vertebrae above, and trapping nerves.   Hence a sprained ankle may lead to sciatica, low-back pain, headaches, and pain in the opposite shoulder.

Injury to one kind of structure can also cause a problem in a completely different system of the body.   A fall on the ice can jar the spine resulting in a blockage of spinal nerves at any level, perhaps those that feed the uterus and reproductive organs, leading to painful menstrual cramps.

Just as essential as the motion of the tissues is the free flow of fluids that permeate the body.  Injury can twist the blood vessels that bring nutrients to damaged tissue and the lymphatic channels that wash away inflammation-causing debris.  The injured site then becomes increasingly compromised.  Further, injury can constrict the nerves that manage the complex task of healing.  Restoring motion to all these systems, not just to the joints, is essential to healing.

Once the somatic dysfunction is identified—an area of restriction or rigidity—the area can be aligned, its fluid pathway can be restored, and it can be integrated with the rest of the body.  The body orients naturally towards health.  When anatomic restrictions are removed, the body’s self-regulating mechanisms are liberated to optimize the healing process.

For an osteopathic practitioner, the basic principle is to find what is not moving, invite it to move, and trust the body’s capacity to heal itself.

-Article by Jenny Trost

 

Jenny Trost is a certified Osteopath. Through her business, Pacific Osteopathy, Jenny offers treatments from her studio as well as out of the Victoria Pilates studio. For an appointment with Jenny, contact her at 250-891-2391 or jenny@pacificosteopathy.ca